Education and Advocacy

Historic preservation happens on every level, from neighbors supporting a beloved local landmark to national organizations advocating for preservation legislation. Become informed. Get involved. Help preserve a place that matters to you.

Lower Providence Community House

Charlotte’s once-flourishing farming economy is neatly represented by the little log cabin known as the Lower Providence Community House.

Built in 1938 on land sold for $1 to the Providence Women’s Club, the building housed this social and charitable club for decades, and later also provided a space for public meetings, lectures, films, and wartime support activities. Its membership continues to this day.

The stalwart cabin was designated a Historic Landmark by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission in 1995. In 2008 members renovated the building. The club currently sponsors a monthly lecture series from March through October.

Learn more about Lower Providence Community House and the lecture series.

Preservation Organizations

To find out more about local history and ways to be active in the preservation movement, consult these organizations. You will find links to and lists of many other groups in your area and throughout the country that raise awareness and take action to preserve our built pasts.

Local

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission

The commission recommends real and personal property for historic landmark designation, conducts design review, and buys and sells endangered properties through its revolving fund. The commission has information on more than 300 local historic landmark properties and survey reports.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic District Commission

Six of Charlotte's most significant older neighborhoods (Dilworth, Fourth Ward, Plaza-Midwood, Wesley Heights, Hermitage Court, and Wilmore) have been designated by the Charlotte City Council as Local Historic Districts. The 12-member commission works with property owners to ensure that development or renovation occurs in a manner that is consistent with the character of the neighborhood.